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How much wind is too much

Old 07-02-2016, 07:16 PM
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rcpilot134
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Default How much wind is too much

I realize that this is a broad question with alot of variables. But excluding umx models, how much wind do you guys fly in and still find it "enjoyable".

I see posts of guys flying 20mph winds and cant imagine that. When it starts pushing 10, I pack it in. Even my models with AS3X, they get pushed around. Just curious.
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Old 07-02-2016, 07:35 PM
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Mogg2112
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How much wind is too much depends entirely on the pilot and their comfort level. Personally, I hate flying in anything over 7-8mph, but I can manage all my larger planes in winds up to 12mph (as long as it's steady). Anything over that and I won't fly. Gusting winds are particularly irritating and I refuse to fly if it's gusting since it's so unpredictable. However, there are some guys in my club that will fly in winds over 20+mph, simply because they have the experience and are comfortable doing so. Glow planes tend to handle wind better than electrics from what I've seen due to their increased weight, but there are exceptions I'm sure.
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Old 07-02-2016, 08:37 PM
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fhhuber
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Slope soaring if the wind didn't blow us off the hill it wasn't too much to fly.

Current AMA RC Aerobatics (Pattern) regulations:
6.7
:
The maximum sustained winds
during a pattern
contest shall be 30 knots. The
CD shall suspend flying when the sustained
winds (excluding gusts) exceed this limit. Flying
shall be restarted when the
wind recedes
.
The
CD
may also suspend flying due to wind when in
his/her opinion, flying has become
unsafe due to
field or other circumstances. The CD will make
the final decision as to the wind speed and that
decision may not be questioned by contestants.

Its mainly a function of aircraft size, weight and normal flying speed as to what amount of wind is practical.
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Old 07-02-2016, 11:05 PM
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tobydogs
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Our club is located on top of an old closed landfill. It's always windy....if you don't fly in wind 10 to 15+mph ,you don't fly. Now today was 10 to15 with gusts to 20mph. This was the perfect day to polish the dull headlights on the old pilot, also do some chores around the house . Now Sunday! should be 10+ ,thats perfect.

altimately,it depends on what your flying.
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Old 07-02-2016, 11:19 PM
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Wrongway-Feldman
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These days I fly in any wind conditions. Just a matter of mind over matter, if I don't mind it don't matter.
I don't fly all my planes in gale force conditions, but I do have a couple I love throwing up in the high speed wind.
One is the axn floater jet. It is a blast to fly in the wind.
The second is my Multiplex Dogfighter. With the high speed setup it loves the wind.
Don't have a gyro in either. They just don't need it.
If I ever put together a hat cam I'll post some video.
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Old 07-03-2016, 01:00 AM
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Fishbonez
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Originally Posted by Wrongway-Feldman View Post
These days I fly in any wind conditions. Just a matter of mind over matter, if I don't mind it don't matter.
I don't fly all my planes in gale force conditions, but I do have a couple I love throwing up in the high speed wind.

Same here. In ole Wyo if you can not handle 10+mph winds with gusts then you just dont fly. Here the wind is unpredictable. One moment 5 mph one minute later 15 mph winds
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Old 07-03-2016, 01:09 AM
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firemanbill
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Wind is relative. I just depends on your ability, type of plane, conditions, and many other factors.

I will fly my 1/4 scale Cub in winds that make most other people stay on the ground. It is a really big plane though and can handle it. I wouldn't fly my smaller lighter stuff int he same conditions.

Experience level is key also. I will fly in winds now that would have kept me at home 5 years ago.

But to answer the general broad question. If you look out and think, in your opinion (the key part of that statement), it is too windy... it probably is.
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Old 07-03-2016, 08:06 AM
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Mogg2112
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Originally Posted by firemanbill View Post
Experience level is key also. I will fly in winds now that would have kept me at home 5 years ago.

But to answer the general broad question. If you look out and think, in your opinion (the key part of that statement), it is too windy... it probably is.
So true. When I was first learning to fly, anything over 5mph would make me nervous. I'm gradually getting more comfortable flying in the wind, but I still try to avoid it as much as possible. I prefer flying early in the morning or in the evening since that's when there seems to be little to no wind, at least where I live.

Some wind can work to your advantage though and I've found it helps if there's a steady light breeze when landing faster low or mid-wing birds.

It's the taking off part when it's windy that worries me the most. I've also noticed that when it's windy, I need to usually cut my flight time by a couple minutes since my lipo packs tend to drain faster when I'm fighting the wind.
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Old 07-03-2016, 09:48 AM
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dahawk
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It's windy here in N Texas. I've gotten use to 10-15. If it's a sustained wind, no problem. I just repeat to myself" " The plane doesn't know its windy !" High gusts or turbulent air does cause a problem. I hate sudden surprise's like rollers coming off the tree lines.

15 mph doesn't bother heli pilots at all, unfortunately, I'm not one of them

I do find my edf's perform much better in the wind than foam park flyers. Some of the larger and heavier balsa planes perform pretty well too.

I check winderfinder.com which I have found to be very accurate. If I know it's going to be windy, I plan for a day of flying edf's.

Hawk
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Old 07-03-2016, 09:55 AM
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If it is windy I don't bother and it is not because I can't. I have flown many hundreds of times in wind including sloping, however I like calm as I get much more pleasure flying in no wind situations and because I can fly whenever I want I don't need to fly if it is windy.
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Old 07-03-2016, 10:33 AM
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JetPlaneFlyer
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Originally Posted by firemanbill View Post
Wind is relative. I just depends on your ability, type of plane, conditions, and many other factors.
+1.. it's really totally dependant on so many variables that stating one wind speed is almost meaningless. Pilot ability, model type, model size, flying site, wind direction.. and probably a bunch of other stuff all come into it. I suppose though if pushed I'd say for typical fixed wing models around 15mph is when many people would start to consider not flying, but there is a wide tolerance for the reasons touched on previously.

For instance the site I fly at is lined with trees to the north and south, but open to the east and went. So if there is an east or west wind it's much less of a problem than a north or south wind. This is because the n/s wind causes strong turbulence as the wind tumbles over the trees, plus you have to either land crosswind or approach over the trees, both of which add a significant degree of difficulty.

One of the reasons I like to fly helis lately is that large helis can be flown in very strong winds and high turbulence. I can fly my big helis way beyond the point where anything fixed wing would be grounded, and for some reason over the last year or so it's almost always been windy in these parts.
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Old 07-03-2016, 12:10 PM
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solentlife
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I used to fly in all sorts when I was all Glow ...

Now being mostly E powered - I don't like the buffeting around that usually accompanies wind. I will fly models in wind ... my old Cessna will actually fly backwards in strong wind ... I can do vertical 3 point landings with her.
But I usually reserve strong wind days to my bigger fuel powered models. The Zlin laps it up.

Nigel
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Old 07-03-2016, 09:53 PM
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If its windy enough to pick the plane up while its sitting on the ground, then its to windy. For my standards anyway. :P
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Old 07-03-2016, 10:20 PM
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I fly with tobydogs and I second his comments. I regularly fly in 10-15mph and have flown in gusts up to 30+mph. The other day I was flying a small foamy and at times I was flying backwards, lots of fun. I think that getting the reflexes and feel for the air and how the plane responds to it make you a better pilot. Most of the time the plane doesn't care, especially if it's a steady wind. The landing can be tricky but good practice, sometimes I'll just shoot crosswind touch and goes and try different approaches.
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Old 07-04-2016, 12:03 AM
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I live in Kansas, where 10 MPH wind counts as "dead calm." I get maybe 5-10 actually calm days a year; 12-20 MPH is much more likely. 30 MPH is pretty common. Planes that require little to no wind don't get out of the hangar much.

For me, around 35 MPH is where the weather becomes too much, in large part because that's the top speed for many of my favorite windy day planes.

Here's one of my light wings in 25MPH winds. (No gyro, as if that needed saying. )



edit: Found this older video of me flying my 12 ounce light Stryker in winds gusting up to 45MPH.
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Old 07-04-2016, 12:13 AM
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That's no fun Mark. Texas is off my emigrate list for sure.
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Old 07-04-2016, 07:08 AM
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It's a ... different kind of fun.
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Old 07-15-2016, 08:50 AM
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If I have a hard time keeping the plane still for takeoff, I usually pack it in, but it depends on how badly I want to fly.

My slows tick is a ton of fun with a braced wing at up to about 15mph. I can fly it in as much as 25mph, but much over that and you are just fighting to keep it in the feild. 5 seconds looping around one way, then wot and 2 min to get it back.
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Old 07-15-2016, 03:13 PM
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Wrongway-Feldman
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Originally Posted by hayofstacks View Post
If I have a hard time keeping the plane still for takeoff, I usually pack it in, but it depends on how badly I want to fly.

My slows tick is a ton of fun with a braced wing at up to about 15mph. I can fly it in as much as 25mph, but much over that and you are just fighting to keep it in the feild. 5 seconds looping around one way, then wot and 2 min to get it back.
Try flying cross wind as apposed to up and down wind.
With proper rudder control you can start to have some real fun that way.
Or forget about circuits all together and work on holding it in place in the air. It's terrific practice on using all controls simultaneously.
After a few successful flight you may find that flying without wind can actually get a little boring. Lol
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Old 07-15-2016, 04:21 PM
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Fishbonez
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Originally Posted by Wrongway-Feldman View Post
After a few successful flight you may find that flying without wind can actually get a little boring. Lol
Its funny you said that. Here in Ole Wyo we sometimes dont know how to act if the wind is calm. " How do I take off? How do I land? My goodness this plane is really out of trim..."
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Old 07-15-2016, 04:25 PM
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Wrongway-Feldman
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Originally Posted by Fishbonez View Post
Its funny you said that. Here in Ole Wyo we sometimes dont know how to act if the wind is calm. " How do I take off? How do I land? My goodness this plane is really out of trim..."
Haha. It's the same here in Saskatchewan. I sometimes forget how to hand launch a plane when the wind isn't trying to rip it out of my hand.
And I usually have to go round a couple of times on landings on calm days cause I keep miscalculating the length of the required approach.
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Old 07-17-2016, 12:22 AM
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If you can't stand up,it's too windy to fly
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Old 07-17-2016, 09:44 PM
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Just lean against a wall!
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Old 07-17-2016, 10:57 PM
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tobydogs
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How much is to much wind?

another question "when it's mid 90's and humid....how much is to little wind?"
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Old 07-18-2016, 10:04 AM
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Fortunately for me, today's weather here is predicted to be 96 degrees, 54% humidity and 20 MPH winds. Trifecta!
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