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I cannot get solder to stick

Old 08-15-2005, 03:58 AM
  #1  
crashing
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Default I cannot get solder to stick

I have a new lipo 11.1 and I cannot get the solder to stick to the deans plug I scratched it all up and put solder on the wire but &%$#&%#^%# it will not stick edited for language. any suggestions? arrrrrrrrrrr.....


sighned frustrated crashing
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Old 08-15-2005, 04:07 AM
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Wingdoctor
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Try soldering paste.

you can get it at Home Depot, or Radio Shack
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Old 08-15-2005, 04:12 AM
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crashing
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Thanx, I think I have some. I am not as think as you dumb I am....
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Old 08-15-2005, 05:52 PM
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Jason T
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Crashing,

I have better luck with solder that is small diameter. I have some solder that does not melt well. I also started using Dean's solder and it works really well. BTW, what size is what wattage is your soldering iron? I would suggest at least a 40watt iron.

Also, make sure you tin both the wire and the connector itself.

Jason
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Old 08-16-2005, 03:21 AM
  #5  
Matt Kirsch
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There are four essential ingredients in the recipe for a successful soldering job:

1. Good heat.
2. Good solder.
3. Clean EVERYTHING.
4. Practice.

Got a soldering gun? THROW IT AWAY. Soldering guns are junk. You want an iron, a constant source of heat that's warm and ready when you are. 25 Watts is plenty for most smaller tasks, but 40W is a good choice for soldering Dean's plugs. Radio Shack has a nice dual-range setup with a base that doesn't cost too much.

I use only Radio Shack rosin core solder, .032 diameter.

Notice that sponge in the base of the Radio Shack soldering station? That's to clean the tip of the iron. Clean the tip before you go to apply solder EVERY TIME. Clean the tip after you're done. Just wipe it on the damp sponge.

Heat the wire until the solder melts and flows when applied to the wire. Don't heat the solder.
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Old 08-16-2005, 06:36 AM
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olmod
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Default mmm

Add heat to the deans tab after a second or 2 then push the solder between the iron and the tab, this should be done quickly as you can overheat the insulator,some like to plug in the mating half of a spare to act as a heat sink.
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Old 08-16-2005, 10:58 AM
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I'll try to put up some pictures today on this subject since it is something I do all the time. Make sure you are using rosin core solder not acid solder. Especially on your wire connections. Battery tabs can be especially problematic as some are very hard to take solder. There is solder specifically for silver soldering and for aluminum. If there is any corrosion solder won't stick either.

You would be totally amazed what a good iron will do for you too. It is a good investment. I use weller irons but I do heavy duty soldering on a constant basis.

Just my 2 cents worth.
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Old 08-16-2005, 11:51 AM
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Hi Crashing
my answer is all of the above and lots of practice. And yes, good equipment and prep. will always result in a good job.

Cheers HR
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Old 08-16-2005, 01:25 PM
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Look in the Battery and Charger Forum for a hint on soldering plugs using fuel tubing.
George
Gainesville Fl
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Old 08-24-2005, 02:16 PM
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2thelmt
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Originally Posted by crashing
I have a new lipo 11.1 and I cannot get the solder to stick to the deans plug I scratched it all up and put solder on the wire but &%$#&%#^%# it will not stick edited for language. any suggestions? arrrrrrrrrrr.....


sighned frustrated crashing
Hi...new to this forum and wanted to add to this post.
First, tin your wire and the tabs on the deans plug. If the solder won't stick you are not getting enough heat to the tab or the tip of your gun is damaged...make sure the Deans tab is not held by anything metal that can sink the heat away. Make sure your the tip of your iron is clean (sponge with water will clean as previously posted) and not damaged - should be a copper colour. Tin (with solder)the end of your iron immediately after cleaning. Also, leave a glob of solder on the tip of the gun after use for storage...this will protect the tip of the iron.

Hope this helps.

P.S. I use a butane pencil iron that produces alot of heat.

Ian
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Old 08-24-2005, 02:23 PM
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debhicks
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What kind of Solder are you using. If you have solder with flux in it that is good. If it still will not stick then if you have some liquid flux you can prep the surface with that first. The iron needs to be just right. With all the other explainations here you should be able to get it done. Aluminum is probably the hardest thing to solder. There is a product called Solder-it by Kool-it. It is advertised for aluminum and pot metal. It is a paste.

I hope that helps or has not been repeated
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Old 08-26-2005, 03:16 PM
  #12  
EZ1
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Originally Posted by 2thelmt
Hi...new to this forum and wanted to add to this post.
First, tin your wire and the tabs on the deans plug. If the solder won't stick you are not getting enough heat to the tab or the tip of your gun is damaged...make sure the Deans tab is not held by anything metal that can sink the heat away. Make sure your the tip of your iron is clean (sponge with water will clean as previously posted) and not damaged - should be a copper colour. Tin (with solder)the end of your iron immediately after cleaning. Also, leave a glob of solder on the tip of the gun after use for storage...this will protect the tip of the iron.

Hope this helps.

P.S. I use a butane pencil iron that produces alot of heat.

Ian
Take care touching a soldering tip with molten solder to anything wet with water...it will spit...watch the eyes
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Old 08-26-2005, 03:46 PM
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http://awilletts.ezonemag.com/deansultra.mpg
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Old 08-26-2005, 05:12 PM
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flypaper 2
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Crashing:
What soldering iron,gun, solder, type of flux are you using?
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Old 08-26-2005, 06:19 PM
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2thelmt
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Originally Posted by EZ1
Take care touching a soldering tip with molten solder to anything wet with water...it will spit...watch the eyes
Thanks for the warning, but in all my years of board repair I have yet to see solder "spit" while cleaning the tip.
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Old 08-26-2005, 08:06 PM
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Originally Posted by 2thelmt
Thanks for the warning, but in all my years of board repair I have yet to see solder "spit" while cleaning the tip.
Yeah, quite possibly, but really, Ive seen soldering irons unexpectedly spit back ...everything has many variables. But when molten alloy at 600+F hits water it still produces instant steam. On circuit board solderin' the inputs are kinda small so I reckon the results are proportional.The range of soldering "irons" I have kicking 'round range from the miniscule to over 2 pounds of copper on the business end, so maybe I was just a tad cautious because of being gun shy of molten lead and water donchaknow? *S*
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Old 08-27-2005, 12:42 AM
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Everything clean is always good. A temperature controlled soldering iron is always better than a fixed temperature iron. At work or at home, my adjustables are always set to between 640 and 660. The non-adjustables we've checked at work seem to run between 700 and 800 degrees. Way too hot for most soldering. I've been getting used to the new lead free solder, with no-clean flux, which has a slightly higher melting point, but still haven't had to go above 660. If the iron is too hot, it can burn away the flux before the flux can do its job. It can also kill the tip and make it useless pretty quick.
I have Wellers in 20 and 40 watt ranges, and they do about 90% of my soldering. I have a 60 watt with a hammerhead tip for making up battery sticks, and it sometimes scares me since it gets up to almost 800 degrees F. I haven't used either of my soldering guns in years. The nice thing about the Wellers, and other adjustables, is they have different sized replaceable tips so you can tailor the heat mass to the job. For Deans, I use a 3/16" screwdrive tip on my 40 Watt iron. That's Weller p/n ETD.
Never use any flux labeled as acid. Only RMA or one of the no-clean electronics solders. 63-37 is the best for electronics, but 60-40 is acceptable for most uses.
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Old 08-29-2005, 01:42 PM
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Also never solder in your underwear,Ouchhhh!
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Old 08-29-2005, 06:00 PM
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Default Soldering Battery Pack Wires to Connectors

Use a good soldering iron, not a gun or torch, that has at least 37 watts for soldering wires to connectors. 47 watts is probably a little better. A flat chisel tip is better than a round pointed one.Use electronic-type soldering paste flux and name brand rosin core electronics-type solder in a 63/37 to 60/40 tin/lead alloy.It is a good idea to practice soldering technique using an old connector before doing the real thing. Strip only one wire of a battery pack and complete soldering before stripping the other one to prevent shorts and panic and potential fire/explosion. Strip wire insulation carefully to avoid cutting wire strands. Apply a dab of paste flux to wire and "tin" the wire with a clean soldering iron tip. Keep wiping "slag" off the iron tip with damp paper towel or sponge and apply fresh solder to tip so that it is always bright and shiny looking while in use. Mount the connector in a vise or vise grips, etc. Apply a dab of past flux to the connecter teriminal and "tin" the terminal (coat it with a little solder) .Put proper size heat shrink tubing on wire away from the heat. Hold tinned wire against the terminal. Position the clean iron tip against the terminal and with your third hand ( or helper) flow a small amount solder to the terminal and watch it wick into wire, the apply more solder to complete the solder joint ( just enough for strength). Inspect for good solder flow and "filleting".Make sure that solder has not bridged over to the other terminal, reheat and it should flow back into the joint. Slide heat shrink tubing over the joint, shrink with heat gun. Now repeat above for the other battery pack wire, don't forget the heat shrink tubing.
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Old 08-29-2005, 08:37 PM
  #20  
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Originally Posted by crashing
I have a new lipo 11.1 and I cannot get the solder to stick to the deans plug I scratched it all up and put solder on the wire but &%$#&%#^%# it will not stick edited for language. any suggestions? arrrrrrrrrrr.....


sighned frustrated crashing
If the plug has been properly cleaned with denatured ethanol or 91% rubbing alcohol, the solder should flow (it's flow, not stick) If it beads up and flakes off the problem is usually inadequate heat. The plug itself must reach solder melt temperature. Make sure you have rosin core solder. The correct way to solder is to put your iron against the plug with as much contact area as possible and then feed the solder in between the iron tip and the plug. If the iron is hot enough (another potential issue) the solder will immediately melt and flow across the surface of the plug. Deans plugs are gold and nothing takes tin-lead solder better than gold. When you solder wires to Deans plugs "tin" the plug and the wire separately and then melt (flow) them together in one motion. Soldering correctly is an art form. Practice makes perfect. I took a whole community college course on military specification soldering techniques.
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Old 08-29-2005, 09:07 PM
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We had a certified contractor come out to our lab to give 6 of us the MIL spec course and cert. The original course took 8 full days, classroom and practical. 4 of us made the certification. After about 6 years, the requirements changed, so we got the contractor back. The changes to the specs only required 18 hours class and practice to retain the certification.
A funny thing happened in Air Force tech school. We had a 2-day course on hard soldering (high temperature silver soldering). The instructor showed us a couple different joints, cutting them open to show how cleanliness and proper heat affects the quality of the joint. Turns out he couldn't understand how some people couldn't get a good joint in class no matter what they did, but said they never had any trouble with tin-lead soldering. The instructor said he couldn't do a good tin-lead joint to save his life, when the silver soldering is so easy, it almost makes good joints by itself without human intervention. Of course, an E3 (me) doesn't disagree with an E7 (him).
Cleanliness, good flux, and proper heat control are the secrets to all soldering.
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Old 09-24-2005, 10:12 AM
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Duster52
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Originally Posted by EZ1
Take care touching a soldering tip with molten solder to anything wet with water...it will spit...watch the eyes
Wiping the tip of a soldering iron with a damp cloth is the recommended method of keeping the tip clean. I never solder without a damp cloth nearby.
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Old 10-06-2005, 04:55 PM
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Another good tip is to use a kitchen scubbing pad made of woven wire mesh to clean your tip with instead of the foam pad. Just push your iron's tip through the mesh before and after every solder joint for trouble free soldering...
Cheers,
DougB
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Old 10-06-2005, 05:00 PM
  #24  
hoppy
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Originally Posted by crashing
I have a new lipo 11.1 and I cannot get the solder to stick to the deans plug I scratched it all up and put solder on the wire but &%$#&%#^%# it will not stick edited for language. any suggestions? arrrrrrrrrrr.....


sighned frustrated crashing
What size soldering iron are you using? A 25-40W iron with a 3/16" - 1/4" spade tip will work good. The irons with those pencil lead thin tips can't deliver the heat needed.
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Old 10-06-2005, 05:13 PM
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The spitting solder problem usually only happens when water is used to cool a partially soldered joint. Water drops get trapped by fresh molten solderwhen continuing soldering, flashes into steam and can cause a miniature explosion. Ran into this years ago when I was building some of the HO corrugated metal buildings sold by a company name of Suydam. Trying to hurry, I used to hit joints with a wet rag or sponge, and once in a while get hit with a couple splatters. Solder training courses usually refer to the possibility, but using a damp sponge is the accepted method of keeping the tip clean of flux and dross build-up. Just wipe the tip across the sponge. There are also cleaning pastes that work real well if things build up too much.
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